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Are you a daily law breaker?

Which are the most common laws broken whilst driving?

Plenty of drivers on the road will tell you that they never break the law whilst driving, and that they are fully aware of all the laws of the road. However, is this true or are there some laws that people are breaking without realising it. Of course, in terms of some laws that are being broken, people do know but they think they can get away with it.

Speeding

Mobile radar gun catching drivers breaking the speeding law

Driving over the speed limit is a one law that people often think they can get away with breaking. Many drivers believe that you can drive 10% over the speed limit so 33mph in a 30mph zone, but this is not actually the case. Many cars’ speedometers allow for a 10% error in driver over estimation of speed but this does not mean drivers should go over by the 10%. If you are caught driving over the speed limit on a mobile radar speed gun by the police you can be prosecuted even if you are just 1mph over. Speed limits are there for a reason, so stick to them.

Driving over the Limit

Car key, cuffs and a drink, promoting the drink driving law

If you can’t go out without having a drink then make sure that you are clear on how much alcohol will take you over the legal limit. In England and Wales, the alcohol limit is 80 milligrams per 100 millilitres of blood, 35 micrograms per 100 millilitres of breath of 107 milligrams per 100 millilitres of urine. In other countries in Europe these limits are less. To see what an alcohol unit looks like check out the handy information on Drinkaware.co.uk. Remember that certain factors will affect how much alcohol will take you over the limit; Your weight, age, sex and metabolism, what you have eaten recently, type of alcohol and even your stress levels. The safest way to be sure you are okay to drive is not to drink and drive.

Smoking whilst driving

On 1st October 2015, the law changed, making it illegal to smoke in a car if you are carrying anyone under the age of 18. Whilst this law is not being rigidly enforced by most police forces, is it really worth the risk? Smoking whilst driving if you have nobody under 18 in the car is not illegal but could lead to trouble with the law if it results in careless driving.

Mobile Phones and Driving

mobile phone driving laws

It is illegal to use a hand-held phone whilst driving, this applies if you are stopped at traffic lights, queuing in traffic or supervising a learner driver. If you want to answer a call on your hand-held phone you must pull over before answering it. You may only use a hand-held phone whilst you are driving if you need to call 99 or 112 in an emergency and it is not possible to pull over. Using a mobile phone illegally whilst driving carries a minimum penalty of 6 points and a £200 fine.

You can however use a hands-free phone whilst driving using a voice controlled Bluetooth system. If you handle your phone whilst doing so it is illegal.  If you are driving a car that does not have bluetooth, then perhaps its time for an upgrade? Take a look at car leasing here, it’s a great way to get a car that you perhaps could not afford to purchase outright.

Staying safe on the roads is important, not only for your own safety but for pedestrians and other road users, and these laws are there for a reason.